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Edit summary : The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8] The octagonal market, designed by Edwin Lutyens, was built in 1921 as an important part of a wider development plan. In the years that followed, the Connaught Place shopping area was built adjacent to it, catering to the daily needs of thousands of government employees living in nearby residential areas built for them in 1925.[3] These employees worked at the nearby Secretariat Building, as most government offices had relocated from Old Delhi a decade before the new capital had been inaugurated in 1931. Many of the employees were brought into the new capital from distant parts of India, including the Bengal Presidency and Madras Presidency.[4] Durga Puja Visarjan procession passing through Gol Dak Khana (Adjacent to Gole Market). After the partition of India, noted painter B.C. Sanyal and his wife Snehlata, a ghazal singer and actress moved to Gole Market. Their "refugee studio" became a hub for artists and students in New Delhi and was later known as Gallery 26. The studio later gave rise to the Delhi Shilpi Chakra, which Sanyal founded with several of her artist friends. This organisation had an important influence on the contemporary art of North India.[5][6] By the turn of the 21st century, 28 shops operated in the market, most of them dating back to the 1920s. They included numerous confectioneries, sweet shops, and fast-food restaurants, including Kaleva, Bengali Sweet Shop, Karachi Sweet Shop, and several meat shops. Over the years, the facade deteriorated as a result of unauthorized construction and additions and was in a state of disrepair. The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) fined several shopkeepers for operating without proper licenses or for unhygienic conditions.[7] In 2007, the building was declared unsafe and the NDMC offered shopkeepers alternative shops[8] but they rejected this plan. This forced the NDMC to engage in restoration work. Later, the NDMC proposed granting full heritage status to the building and ending all commercial activities. The traffic police supported the move because running a market in the busy roundabout caused traffic congestion. By May 2009, eviction notices were served to the shopkeepers by the NDMC, which soon had six shops in its possession. The rest of the owners started a campaign against the forced move.[9][10] Later, the NDMC revealed new plans to convert the heritage market into a museum. In February 2013, twenty-eight of the market's shopkeepers petitioned against the NDMC's alleged move to take over their shops in the Delhi High Court. On 20 June 2013, the court ruled in favor of the NDMC but cautioned it against the non-commercial use of the property. The court instructed the shopkeepers to relinquish possession of their stores by 30 June 2013.[11] On 27 June, the Supreme Court upheld the eviction date that had been ordered by the High Court.[8]
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