Topic: Hard Problem

Camp: Agreement / Approachable Via Science / Represetational Illusory

Camp Statement History

Objected
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In Review
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Statement : Recycle

Edit summary : Acording to personal request.
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement : The Michelson-Morley experiment, which demonstrated the invariability of the speed of light irrespective of motion, constituted a serious challenge to classical physics. And, it was not until the development of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, more than 10 years later, that this problem was resolved satisfactorily.
Similarly, crucial to the understanding of Chalmer's "Hard Problem" of consciousness is that it was devised by, specifically, the consciousness of the 'thinker' in an effort to provide a plausible reason for the deficiencies in our current understanding of consciousness itself.
More specifically, it was devised by a consciousness which originates in self-reflection and the thought of the 'thinker' itself. Thus, any attempt to explain or justify our current deficiencies in the understanding of consciousness by the consciousness of the 'thinker' itself *cannot* be objective.
In other words, it is *highly* unlikely that the consciousness of the 'thinker' will consider that there are any fundamental perceptual flaws in either the consciousness of the 'thinker' (that is, its own consciousness) or the scientific method (which is the creation of the consciousness of the 'thinker') which is based upon the metaphysical duality and the thought of the 'thinker'.
In this context, then, Chalmer's "Hard Problem" of consciousness is nothing more than a re-wording of the metaphysical duality--which has established the foundation of Western philosophy, physics and the scientific method itself for hundreds of years--and is nothing less than a 'Michelson-Morley experiment' for both a 'classical' science of consciousness and a science of the 'classical' consciousness.
In other words, just as the findings of quantum physics have broken down the synthetic distinction between the "observer" and the "observation"; so, too, the "Hard Problem" of consciousness cannot synthetically be separated from the consciousness which has devised that "problem". That is, it is only *after* the 'movement' of self-reflection and the thought of the 'thinker' that the "Hard Problem" has been conceived of as a "problem " at all. And it is a "problem" which the consciousness of the 'thinker' has been very directly involved in creating in the first place.
Thus, similar to the Michelson-Morley experiment with regards to classical physics, the "Hard Problem" not only demonstrates the severe limitations of "thought" words in describing consciousness; it also demonstrates the necessity of a completely *new* paradigm of consciousness (including the use of "picture" words); in which thought itself is looked upon not as an 'inertial frame of reference' for establishing the absolute truth about human consciousness; but as only *one* source of information for a more complete description of human consciousness which includes information from beyond the frame of reference of the scientific method; for example, the 'unconscious' and the "observing consciousness".

Edit summary : clarification
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Michael
Go live Time :
Statement : The Michelson-Morley experiment, which demonstrated the invariability of the speed of light irrespective of motion, constituted a serious challenge to classical physics. And, it was not until the development of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, more than 10 years later, that this problem was resolved satisfactorily.
Similarly, crucial to the understanding of Chalmers' "Hard Problem" of consciousness is that it was devised by, specifically, the consciousness of the 'thinker' in an effort to provide a plausible reason for the deficiencies in our current understanding of consciousness itself.
More specifically, it was devised by a consciousness which originates in self-reflection and the thought of the 'thinker' itself. Thus, any attempt to explain or justify our current deficiencies in the understanding of consciousness by the consciousness of the 'thinker' itself *cannot* be objective.
In other words, it is *highly* unlikely that the consciousness of the 'thinker' will consider that there are any fundamental perceptual flaws in either the consciousness of the 'thinker' or the scientific method which is based upon the metaphysical duality and the thought of the 'thinker'.
In this context, then, Chalmers "Hard Problem" of consciousness is nothing more than a re-wording of the metaphysical duality--which has established the foundation of Western philosophy, physics and the scientific method itself for hundreds of years--and is nothing less than a 'Michelson-Morley experiment' for both a 'classical' science of consciousness and a science of the 'classical' consciousness.
In other words, just as the findings of quantum physics have broken down the synthetic distinction between the "observer" and the "observation"; so, too, the "Hard Problem" of consciousness cannot synthetically be separated from the consciousness which has devised that "problem". That is, it is only *after* the 'movement' of self-reflection and the thought of the 'thinker' that the "Hard Problem" has been conceived as a "problem " at all. And it is a "problem" which the consciousness of the 'thinker' has been very directly involved in creating in the first place.
Thus, similar to the Michelson-Morley experiment with regards to classical physics, the "Hard Problem" not only demonstrates the severe limitations of "thought" words in describing consciousness; it also demonstrates the necessity of a completely *new* paradigm of consciousness (including the use of "picture" words); in which thought itself is looked upon not as an 'inertial frame of reference' for establishing the absolute truth about human consciousness; but as only *one* source of information for a more complete description of human consciousness which includes information from beyond the frame of reference of the scientific method; for example, the 'unconscious' and the "observing consciousness".

Edit summary : clarification
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Michael
Go live Time :
Statement : The Michelson-Morley experiment, which demonstrated the invariability of the speed of light irrespective of motion, constituted a serious challenge to classical physics. And, it was not until the development of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, more than 10 years later, that this problem was resolved satisfactorily.
Similarly, crucial to the understanding of Chalmers' "Hard Problem" of consciousness is that it was devised by, specifically, the consciousness of the 'thinker' in an effort to provide a plausible reason for the deficiencies in our current understanding of consciousness itself.
More specifically, it was devised by a consciousness which originates in self-reflection and the thought of the 'thinker' itself. Thus, any attempt to explain or justify our current deficiencies in the understanding of consciousness by the consciousness of the 'thinker' itself *cannot* be objective.
In other words, it is *highly* unlikely that the consciousness of the 'thinker' will consider that there are any fundamental perceptual flaws in either the consciousness of the 'thinker' or the scientific method which is based upon the metaphysical duality and the thought of the 'thinker'.
In this context, then, Chalmers "Hard Problem" of consciousness is nothing more than a re-wording of the metaphysical duality--which has established the foundation of Western philosophy, physics and the scientific method itself for hundreds of years--and is nothing less than a 'Michelson-Morley experiment' for both a 'classical' science of consciousness and a science of the 'classical' consciousness.
In other words, it not only demonstrates the severe limitations of "thought" words in describing consciousness; it also demonstrates the necessity of a completely new paradigm of consciousness (including the use of "picture" words) in which thought itself is looked upon not as an 'inertial frame of reference'; but as only one source of information for a more complete description of human consciousness.

Edit summary : clarification
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Michael
Go live Time :
Statement : The Michelson-Morely experiment, which demonstrated the invariability of the speed of light irrespective of motion, constituted a serious challenge to classical physics. And, it was not until the development of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, more than 10 years later, that this problem was resolved satisfactorily.
Chalmers' 'Hard Problem' of consciousness, inasmuch as it is nothing more than a re-wording of the metaphysical duality--which has established the foundation of Western philosophy, physics and the scientific method itself for hundreds of years--is, in fact, the 'Michelson-Morely experiment' for both a 'classical' science of consciousness and a science of the 'classical' consciousness. In other words, it not only demonstrates the severe limitations of "thought" words in describing consciousness; it also demonstrates the necessity of a new paradigm of consciousness (including the use of "picture" words) in which thought itself is looked upon not as an 'inertial frame of reference'; but as only one source of information for a more complete description of human consciousness.

Edit summary : First Version
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Michael
Go live Time :