Topic: Help

Camp: Agreement

Camp Statement History

Objected
Live
Not Live
Old
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share. Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other help resources:


Edit summary : change one capital to lower case.
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share. Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other help resources:


Edit summary :
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share. Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other help resources:


Edit summary :
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other help resources:


Edit summary :
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other help resources:


Edit summary :
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : Attempt 3 to change the name of the link to Wiki Markup and File Upload information
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Mr. Genius
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : Second submission to change the name of the Wiki Markup page
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Mr. Genius
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : Added new name to Wiki Markup page to make it Wiki Markup and File Upload information
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Mr. Genius
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.

Here’s how it works:

When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.

If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.

When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : tweek the paragraph spacing.
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.
Here’s how it works:
When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.
If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.
When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.
The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : fix the links.
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.
Here’s how it works:
When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.
If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.
When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.
The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : Remove bad leading space in one of the paragraphs.
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Help


We recognize that nobody has the time to sift through pages and pages of individual responses, and nobody wants to add yet another response when there are already thousands. That’s why the goal of Canonizer is to group as many similar responses as possible into camp statements and provide a concise and quantitative measure of what everyone believes. That way, the conversation is contained in a manageable structure that allows the user to follow and participate in the most efficient way possible.
Here’s how it works:
When you click on a statement title in the top Camp Tree section, the belief statement for that camp shows up in the bottom pane. The numbers next to the title indicate the number of people in that camp. This is true for the default or popular consensus canonizer algorithm which is one person one vote. If you select a different algorithm, Canonizer reconfigures the system to only count people with certain attributes and re-sorts the camps accordingly. For example, if you select the "Mormon" Canonizer, only the votes of Mormons will be counted and indicated in these numbers. (See this topic on canonization algorithms for more info on how canonization works and how the values are determined.)

Please review the existing camps to see if there is already one that represents what you want to say. If you click on the link for a camp you agree with, you will be taken to the camp page where you can join the camp or directly support it, thereby adding to their numbers. You can also help improve the statement as long as all current members of the camp agree to your proposed edits.
If there is not already a camp you agree with, or if the people in the existing camp object to your proposed changes, you can choose the option to create a new camp. To do this, go to the new parent camp you want to support. Just below the parent camp, click on the link. Then you can add what you want to say to that new camp.
When writing a camp statement, use terms like "We think" instead of "I Think" since you are really giving voice to everyone that thinks like you do, and you look forward to others joining your camp, helping you improve the statement, giving it more influence, and so on.

The camps form a hierarchy of statements. If you join a sub camp of another camp, your vote is counted in all parent camps. Sub camps contain more specific information or points of view that everyone else in the parent camp do not share.
Sibling camps, on the other hand, are considered competing camps. The top level camp is called the "agreement camp" and only contains information that everyone agrees with. So feel free to move or add a new camp in the appropriate place in the structure.

Other Help Pages:


Edit summary : Recycle.
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :
Statement :

Screen Shots


The purpose of this topic is to create various camps for various sequences that can be performed with Canonizer.com, including screen shots.


Edit summary : First Version
Submitted on :
Submitter Nick Name : Brent_Allsop
Go live Time :