Category: Uncategorized

CES Reply: AMA Follow-up, Part 2

During my Reddit AMA which I discussed in yesterday’s post, I received a number of private messages from people frustrated that their angrier, more hostile questions were not allowed, and several insisted that I conduct a similar AMA in a different subreddit, one where I wouldn’t be treated with such kid gloves. This, of course, […]

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CES Reply: Adding Up the Hominems

Since the first time I published my CES Letter reply, I have been accused of engaging in “argumentum ad hominem,” a logical fallacy in which the person making the argument, not the argument itself, becomes the focus of the discussion. In other words, I’ve been repeatedly accused of ignoring Jeremy Runnells’s arguments in order to […]

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CES Reply: Rocks in Hats, Part 1 of a Zillion

This is a serialization of “A Faithful Reply to the CES Letter from a Former CES Employee.”  You can download the whole PDF here, and you can also participate in the Latter-day Saint Survey Project by joining or creating one of the Canonizer camps in the links at the bottom of this post. This is a line-by-line […]

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CES Reply: The Most Correct Book

This is a serialization of “A Faithful Reply to the CES Letter from a Former CES Employee.”  You can download the whole PDF here, and you can also participate in the Latter-day Saint Survey Project by joining or creating one of the Canonizer camps in the links at the bottom of this post. This is […]

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CES Reply: A Clumsy Way to Plagiarize

This is a serialization of “A Faithful Reply to the CES Letter from a Former CES Employee.”  You can download the whole PDF here, and you can also participate in the Latter-day Saint Survey Project by joining or creating one of the Canonizer camps in the links at the bottom of this post. This is […]

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CES Reply: Introduction

As a freshman at the University of Southern California, I was first exposed to what was then commonly referred to as “anti-Mormon literature.” (*I’m not sure what the post-Mormon term for it is now, but you probably know what I’m talking about.) I read “The Godmakers” from cover to cover, which described a church with […]

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